Photon Factory


Mad Science

Read about some of the exciting science research conducted all over the world.

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GREETINGS! The Mad SCIENCEtist here. There are always cool and exciting things happening in SCIENCE all over the world, and here are just a few of the choicest morsels.

A photo showing the continous liquid interface production.


New liquid based 3D printing drastically reduces prototyping time

Scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill have developed a new form of 3D printing that is faster and creates smoother products than currently existing techniques. They use a UV projector to cure a thin layer of resin. The solidified resin is then slowly pulled out of the pool to allow further layers to be cured and form the desired shape. As oxygen blocks the curing process, the bottom of the pool has an oxygen-permeable window that also allows the UV light to pass through, meaning that a thin 'dead layer' is formed to prevent the cured resin from sticking to the bottom.

Read more at popsci

A new photodetector can cleanly discriminate among four states, not just the standard two states of binary logic. Credit: NIST
A new photodetector can cleanly discriminate among four states, not just the standard two states of binary logic. Credit: NIST

A new phase in reading photons: Photodetector beats the quantum limit by a factor of four

"That's not what I meant": human communication is fraught with misinterpretation. Written out in longhand, words and letters can be misread. A telegraph clerk can mistake a dot for a dash. Noise will always be with us, but at least a new JQI device has established a new standard for reading quantum information with a minimum of uncertainty.

Success has come by viewing light pulses not with a single passive detector with but an adaptive network of detectors with feedback. The work on JQI's new, more assured photonic protocol was led by Francisco Becerra and carried out in Alan Migdall's JQI lab.

Read more on Phys.org


University of Arizona physicists led by Arvinder Sandhu (right) take advantage of the world's fastest laser pulses to take snapshots of ultrafast processes such as chemical reactions. Credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews
University of Arizona physicists led by Arvinder Sandhu (right) take advantage of the world's fastest laser pulses to take snapshots of ultrafast processes such as chemical reactions. Credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews

Freezing electrons in flight

Using the world's fastest laser pulses, which can freeze the ultrafast motion of electrons and atoms, University of Arizona physicists have caught the action of molecules breaking apart and electrons getting knocked out of atoms. Their research helps us better understand molecular processes and will ultimately enable us to control them in many possible applications.

Read more on Phys.org


Printed LEDs (Image courtesy of Linköping Universitet)
Printed LEDs (Image courtesy of Linköping Universitet)

White LEDs lighting directly on paper

Imagine a white luminous curtain waving in the breeze. Or wallpaper that lights up your room with perfect white light. The applications are not very far away.White LEDs, made from zinc oxide and a conducting polymer, can be manufactured directly on paper, as shown by Gul Amin in his doctoral thesis at Linköping University.

Read more on the Science News website


Physicists create working transistor from a single atom

Australian and American physicists have built a working transistor from a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon crystal.

The group of physicists, based at the University of New South Wales and Purdue University, said they had laid the groundwork for a futuristic quantum computer that might one day function in a nanoscale world and would be orders of magnitude smaller and quicker than today’s silicon-based machines.

Read more on the New York Times website


Two diamonds can share a single phonon.
Two diamonds can share a single phonon.

Diamonds entangled at room temperature

Two diamonds separated by about 15 cm have been put into a state of quantum entanglement. The experiment, carried out by physicists in the UK, was performed at room temperature and involved creating phonons (quantized vibrations) within the crystals. By showing that quantum entanglement can be achieved in two large and distant diamonds at room temperature, the research team has provided further evidence that a practical quantum computer could be within our grasp.

Read more on physicsworld.com


Carbon dioxide with carbon-14 has different vibrational energies.
Carbon dioxide with carbon-14 has different vibrational energies.

Cavity spectroscopy does carbon dating

A new way to carbon-date old samples has been developed by physicists in Italy. Unlike current methods, which involve large and costly laboratory equipment, the new technique can be performed using portable and low-cost equipment. The researchers claim that their idea could have other applications, including biomedical procedures, environmental monitoring, fundamental physics and explosives detection.

Read more on physicsworld.com